Government freezes super guarantee

The government has announced that it will freeze the superannuation guarantee at 9.5% until 2021.  Under previous plans, the super contributions paid by employers had been set to increase in 0.5% increments from the current rate of 9.5% until they reached 12% in 2019/2020. It will now be 2025 by the time the guarantee reaches 12%. The rationale behind the freeze on super is that it will ease pressure on the federal budget, due to the significant tax concessions associated with superannuation contributions.

There have been many claims by superannuation industry representatives about how this will impact the size of future superannuation accounts. While these figures can only amount to speculation because nobody can accurately predict wages, fund growth rates and the future taxation of superannuation, it is certain that these changes will result in smaller superannuation accounts. It is also likely that the freeze will disproportionately affect younger Australians, women, low-income earners and part time/casual employees.

There are, however, some strategies that may be useful to individuals seeking to counterbalance the impact of the freeze:

  • Salary sacrificing into your super is a great way to offset the impact of the superannuation guarantee freeze. The money that you salary sacrifice into super, known as concessional contributions, will be taxed at 15%, which for most people is significantly lower than their marginal tax rate. Therefore, salary sacrificing is a particularly effective tax strategy for high-income earners. Concessional contributions are capped at $30 000 per year for most people and $35 000 per year for over 50s. For low-income earners, the government co-contribution is a great way to boost super balances. If you earn under $34 448, the government will contribute 50c for every $1 you put into your super account from your after-tax income (up to a total co-contribution amount of $500). If you earn anywhere up to $49 448, you may also be eligible for reduced co-contribution payments.
  • If you are a low-income earner or are taking a break from work, it may be worth investigating the possibility of your partner making super contributions on your behalf. If you earn less than $13 800, then your partner will be eligible for a low-income spouse tax offset with a maximum value of $540.
  • It may also be beneficial to re-examine your superannuation investment strategy, considering the returns and risks involved with different investment options. Your investment strategy choices should be informed by your age, retirement goals and level of comfort with risk.

Regardless of whether or not the super guarantee freeze has affected your superannuation plans, now is a good time to start putting some serious thought into your superannuation, and the retirement that you want.

About John Manuel

John joined the firm in 1998 as a Senior Accountant and moved up the ranks to became a Prosperity Director in January 2004.

He is a Chartered Accountant and Financial Planner with the Institute of Chartered Accountants recognising him with a Financial Planning Specialist designation.

John was named as one of five finalists in the 2013 Australian Private Banking and Wealth Awards in the category of Outstanding Investment Adviser. John has also been listed as one of Australia's Top 50 Financial Planners by the Australian Financial Review Smart Investor Magazine and named on their Masterclass Top 50 Honour Roll.

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