Forecasting tools for every SME business toolbox

Most Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) have an accounting software package, engage a book-keeper to balance the books, have an accountant prepare year-end financials and tax returns, and will retain boxes full of source documents for as long as they are required to do so1.  Often the compliance burden is seen as exactly that, a burden that while relevant to understanding their position, performance and how much tax they need to pay, is not terribly helpful as a management tool to manage and drive their business forward.  But this need not be the case.

There are a lot of things that differentiate a poor business from a good one.  From a financial perspective, those businesses that closely monitor and respond to changes in their position, performance and liquidity (cash resources), are likely to run operationally better and be in a stronger position to develop and implement more effective growth strategies.

This blog explores at a handful of financial management tools that will help the typical SME business manage its day-to-day operations and help shape its strategy.

The three-way forecast

Most businesses will set an annual P&L budget built from a combination of previous years results, the owner’s growth aspirations, market demand and other economic factors, and sometimes with little or no science at all.  This is an important business discipline.

The process requires you to develop a series of assumptions to drive each individual line of forecast income and expenditure on a monthly basis.  Some assumptions are easier to formulate than others as they may be based on the fixed price nature of items of expenditure, while others will require more subjectivity and ultimately be a sensible estimate.  To formulate assumptions you need to look at:

  • your previous results – often this will be the best indication of what you have demonstrated you can deliver
  • the pricing and length of current contracts both with customers and suppliers
  • interest rate forecasts for variable debt
  • annual rental increases stipulated in your lease
  • economic factors including your industry’s growth
  • your current sales pipeline can help some businesses more accurately forecast – particularly in the earlier months
  • if you are a services business consider your capacity to deliver – make sure you have enough people with the right amount of time available to meet your budget
  • if you are a retailer, wholesaler or manufacturer consider your available inventory levels and pricing
  • think about your phasing of income and expenditure over the year and the seasonality relevant to your business

Once you have formulated your P&L budget you have a realistic base case operating scenario for the business to work toward achieving.  Now it is time for the prudent to think about the things that if they were to occur would have the most material impact (positively or negatively) on your business’ ability to deliver its forecast.  This is known as undertaking a sensitivity analysis to your forecast P&L so you can try to avoid negative scenarios and work towards achieving the positive outcomes..

It is once management have a forecast to work towards that for many SMEs the planning stops.  This is an unfortunate trap that far too many businesses get caught in and it is not until the profits are delivered at expectations but the business has run out of cash, that management realise they may have a problem on their hands.  Remember that an insolvent business is one that cannot afford to pay its debts as and when they fall due not necessarily an unprofitable business – although related, distinctively different and important to understand.  This is why you need to take your P&L forecast and ensure it interacts with a forecast balance sheet and cash flow statement.

Getting a P&L, a balance sheet and a cash flow forecast to talk to each other and reconcile can be tricky, but essentially you need to:

  • take your opening balance sheet position from your prior years financial results and your newly developed P&L forecast
  • from the P&L forecast develop timing assumptions for the payment of creditors, receipts from debtors and the take-up of inventory.  Often debtor days, creditor days and inventory days sourced from previous results can be helpful in determining realistic payment cycles.  You will also need to unwind the opening balances on your balance sheet (ie. you need to pay creditors from the prior period in the current period).  These assumptions are important and will have a large impact on your cash position
  • link non-cash items of expenditure to the relevant asset on the balance sheet (ie. depreciation and amortisation).  This wont impact your cash position
  • consider the amortisation of any loans required over the period (this will reduce the loan and reduce cash)
  • consider items of capital expenditure not considered in the P&L and the cash outlays required

You now have a P&L forecast, a balance sheet forecast and a cash flow forecast.  The cash balance in the balance sheet should reconcile to the cash flow forecast and the net profit on the P&L should reconcile to the increase in equity in the balance sheet.

Now it is important to keep yourself accountable.  Prepare a set of management accounts every month and compare your actual results to your forecast results.  Use this to identify and respond to trends.  If you find that you are falling well short of your forecast, you can always re-forecast.  The more accurate the forecast you are working to, the more control of your financial position you will have.

The short term cash flow

The short term cash flow is a tool to help manage the intra-month cash position of the business.  It will be much more relevant for cash and working capital intensive businesses than others, but every business can benefit from a more detailed understanding of their short term cash position.  Short term cash flow forecasts are often stand alone tools (without the need to link them to P&L’s and balance sheets) that involve more precise assumptions over a 13 week period.  You are always going to have more certainty over your debtor collections next month than you will over your collections in 12 months time.  Depending on the business, the short term cash flow will forecast the receipts and payments on either a weekly or daily basis (use your judgement).  The tool should be used by management to identify and remedy any intra-month liquidity constraints identified by the forecast.  Unlike longer term forecasts that will often be set in place for the year, the short term cash flow needs to be a dynamic tool that should be updated either daily or weekly to track the forecast cash position in as close to real time as possible.

The return on investment consideration

Entrepreneurial small business owners often have the ability to identify an income producing asset and quickly attribute a value to purchase the asset and start driving growth.  This is great when the income associated with the acquisition, when adjusted for the time value of money, exceeds the expenditure following as short as possible “pay-back” period but can be troublesome if things don’t work out exactly how they thought.  An SME owner should consider the following before committing to outlaying new capital on an income-producing asset:

  • What are the cash flows (not profits) that the asset is forecast to generate once operational?
  • What are the sensitivities to those cash flows?
  • What are all the costs associated with the acquisition (consider professional fees, assessments, commissioning, decommissioning, training etc)?
  • What is the rate of return required (a ten year government bond returns 3.45%2 relatively risk free) or if debt funded the cost of funding?
  • What is the pay-back period for the asset – how long will it take to pay back the outlay before surplus cash flows are produced?
  • How do the sensitivities impact the length of the pay-back period?

 

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As a chartered accountant and business advisor for over ten years, I have advised a number of distressed businesses on implementing turn-around strategies.  A common theme with all clients of that nature is poor viability around their forecast position (or no forecasting at all).  A small investment in developing and entrenching these tools within your business can accelerate your businesses growth.  At Prosperity Advisers, we can work with you to develop a three-way forecast, implement a short term cash flow forecast and consider your return on proposed investments.  Call us for an obligation free discussion.

 

Sources:

  1. Seven years for a company per the Corporations Act 2001 and generally five years for small business taxpayers per the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936.
  2. As at 8 September 2014

 

 

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Economic update : the state of the economy and the markets leading up to the Federal Budget

The budget is coming.  With just two weeks to go it looks like, the Government will deliver a budget with a strong long term outlook and an amount of short-term pain including the introduction of a debt levy. Not surprising really given the state of the domestic economy and the sheer number of baby boomers that will leave the workforce in coming years.  

Over the last three months, our economy has behaved with relative stability.

The last quarter, and in particular, the last month has seen the Australian dollar rise adding more pressure to rebalance the domestic economy. On the flip side, housing prices have continued to rise over the quarter combined with an increasing level of building approvals showing confidence is certainly in place.

Interest rates have remained unchanged throughout the quarter at 2.50% and RBA Governor, Glenn Stevens has commented that further rate cuts are unlikely in the short term. The board appear more comfortable with the global outlook and are predicting a reasonable pick-up this year. In Australia, the housing market has rallied in recent months and household spending has continued to increase, encouraged by our historically low interest rates.

In international markets, the US and Euro Regions have shown improvements in recent months. The US Federal Reserve made the announcement in March to reduce asset purchases by a further $10 billion a month to $55 billion. Following on from this announcement, US 3-year and 10-year Government Bond Yields rose by 0.07% and 0.32% respectively.

Overall International Bonds outperformed global equities in March, with the Barclays Global Aggregate (Hedged) $A Index increasing by 0.31%. Treasury stocks and corporate bonds gained by 0.35% and 0.36% respectively for the month.

Australian equities posted modest gains in March, with the ASX 300 rising 0.21% for the month. Commodity prices declined by 2.0% for the month in terms of Australian dollar terms, largely coming from the fall of iron ore, coking coal and steaming coal. On a market capitalisation basis, large company stocks performed better than smaller companies. The S&P / ASX 50 Leaders Index increased by 0.33% in March, while the S&P/ASX Small Ordinaries Index posted a loss of 1.16%.

On a sector basis, Financials (ex-Property) was the best performing and gained 2.92% in March. All the big four banks also recorded another round of strong gains in March. Materials and Healthcare were the weakest sectors declining by -2.89% and -2.07% respectively.

While residential dwelling investments continue to expand, commercial properties (office buildings and large shopping centre investments) declined over the month. The Australian Listed Property Market posted a loss of -1.58%.

In international equities, the Fed’s further decision to taper and indication that quantitative easing could end earlier (possibly within the next 6 months) has resulted in a more optimistic growth outlook. The MSCI North America (Local Currency) Index posted a small return of 0.68% in March.

The best performing region was India with 4.75% over the month due to political optimism. Japan was one of the worst performers losing -7.51% in the first quarter of 2014 due to the sudden 3% sales tax threatening to endanger their recovery.

China lost -1.74% and Europe reversed its previous months strong position and lost -0.65% in March.

Global resources performed poorly in the month with the FTSE Gold Mines Index and HSBC Global Mining Index declining by -11.14% and -5.42% respectively.

Over the coming three months we expect, if there are no sudden changes to the global environment….

1. A Federal Budget that takes some positive steps to reduce the deficit, cutting welfare payments to those not working and incentivising mothers into the workforce; and

2. A stable interest rate environment that is supportive of business and consumer confidence.

Tax Tips to consider before 30 June 2013

With less than two weeks until the end of the financial year and after a federal budget designed to take away a bigger share of income than in previous years, there is no better time to put some effort into year-end planning.

To help you with this we have summarised some things that need to be done before year-end and some other useful ideas that may assist with reducing the tax payable when tax returns are lodged.

Trust distribution minutes

Similar to last year if you operate a trust, it is crucial that prior to 30 June 2013, the trust has resolved how it will distribute the income of the trust. Your adviser is aware of the importance of this issue and is currently in the process of preparing the required minutes. If the required resolution is not completed on time it can result in some unfavourable implications.

Don’t forget also that this year 30 June falls on Sunday. Therefore the target date for completing these resolutions needs to be Friday, 28 June. If you don’t hear from you adviser by 25 June please take steps to contact them.

Trust distributions to companies

Following on from the above distributing net income to a company can be an effective strategy to reduce tax.

While this will have the effect of capping the tax at 30%, consideration will need to be given to what is done with these funds once they are in the company.

In such a case our firm has designed some investment structures that you may find appealing. Please consult your adviser if you wish to find out more.

Loss carry-back rules

A new measure that is currently before the Senate and likely to be passsed soon, provides tax relief to companies by allowing them to carry-back tax losses so they receive a refund against tax previously paid.

These rules are new this year and will allow a one-year loss carry-back in the current financial year. These rules allow tax losses incurred to be carried back and offset against tax paid in the 2012 financial year.

For 2013/14 and later years, tax losses can be carried back and offset against tax paid up to two years earlier.

Loss carry-back will:

  • be available to companies and entities taxed like companies who elect to carry-back losses
  • be capped at $1 million of losses per year
  • apply to revenue losses only
  • be limited to the company’s franking account balance.

Are you thinking about buying a car?

If you operate a small business then there have been some changes from last year that mean that if you have purchased a new car since 1 July 2012, you can claim an instant tax write-off of the first $5,000.

The balance over $5,000 is depreciated as per usual.

Therefore if the business is in the process of buying a new car it is likely to be worthwhile ensuring the purchase happens before 30 June. This could combine with the year end run out sales to produce real benefit.

Purchase of depreciating business assets

In a similar vein to the previous point, the changes implemented from 1 July 2012 also mean that an eligible small business can claim an immediate deduction for depreciating assets costing less than $6,500.

If your business is therefore in need of any new equipment, such as computers or printers, then it might make sense to make those purchases before 30 June.

Superannuation contributions for the year ending 30 June 2013

Just like prior years don’t forget to lock some money away. While superannuation has taken a few punches from the government and the media during the year it is still the most tax effective environment for saving for the future.

It’s therefore critical that contributions are paid before 30 June. It is also critical that care is taken to not exceed the contribution limits.

The maximum concessional contributions for the year ending 30 June 2013 are $25,000. This limit applies on a per person basis and includes concessional contributions from all sources.

The concessional cap will increase to $35,000 for individuals over the age of 60 from 1 July 2013.

At this point it is also useful to note another widely publicised change to the super rules. This change will increase the contributions tax from 15% to 30% for individuals who have income of more than $300,000. It is proposed that this change will apply from 1 July 2012. These changes however are not yet law as their application depends on the passage of the law through parliament.

Government co-contribution

If you have a spouse, parent or child on a low income then consideration should also be given to paying a non-concessional contribution for them.

Non-concessional contributions up to $1,000 will be matched by a government co-contribution of $500 for people earning less than $31,920. Transitional rules apply for incomes up to $46,920.

To be eligible the person must be employed or self-employed.

Non-concessional contributions

While on the topic of superannuation it is also necessary to note non-concessional contributions. These contributions are broadly contributions you make to super from after tax dollars. This is typically used to get additional money into the low taxed super environment

The non-concessional contribution limits are $150,000 per member per year, or $450,000 per three-year period.

As penalties can apply to excess non-concessional contributions, please discuss this with your adviser before making a large non-concessional contributions.

Superannuation pensioners

If your superannuation fund is in pension phase then an important thing to remember is to make the minimum pension payments from your SMSF before 30 June.

While the table below provides further details, we recommend that you discuss this with your adviser before making the payment to ensure the correct amount is paid and to also ensure an appropriate buffer.

Age Minimum
Under   65 3%
65 to   74 3.75%
75 to   79 4.5%
80 to   84 5.25%
85 to   89 6.75%
90 to   94 8.25%
95 to whenever! 10.5%

 

Are you over age 60?

If you are over age 60 and have not started a superannuation pension then you need to call your adviser ASAP, because you are missing out. The taxation benefits of starting a pension mean that there is no tax in the hands of the fund and no tax on the pension income in your hands.

Medical expenses claim

For the current financial year the net medical expenses rebate, which currently allows you to claim a 20% tax offset on out-of-pocket medical expenses above $2,120 (this includes medical costs for all family members), is means tested.

The test applies to people with adjusted taxable incomes in excess of $84,000 and in excess of $168,000 for couples. For people in this income category, the offset will only be available for out of pocket expenses above $5,000 allowing a claim of 10% only.

However the more important point this year is that the net medical expenses tax offset is being phased out from 1 July 2013. This basically means that you need to claim it this year to be able to claim it next year. Therefore if you are close to the line it may be worthwhile bringing forward the payment of some medical expenses to protect access to this concession next year.

Tax rates for 2012/13 and 2013/14

As previously advised new tax rates apply from 1 July 2012. These new rates broadly mean that individuals earning less than $80,000 will pay less tax than in previous years. If your trust distributes to multiple family members then this will be to your advantage.

The tax rates for 2012/13 and 2013/14 are shown below:

Taxable income Tax on this income
0 to $18,200 Nil
$18,201 to $37,000 19 cents for every dollar over $18,200
$37,001 to $80,000 $3,572 plus 32.5 cents for every dollar over $37,000
$80,001 to $180,000 $17,547 plus 37 cents  for every dollar over   $80,000
$180,001 and more $54,547 plus 45 cents for every dollar over $180,000

 

Other items

While there are various other year-end tax planning items that can be considered, it is impossible to provide a comprehensive list in an article such as this, please therefore discuss this with your adviser if there are other items you wish to consider.

This could include prepaying expenses, other issues that affect the timing of deductions, other issues that affect the timing of income receipts, or managing the sale of different assets to either delay a tax payment or offset other capital gains.

Please note that our comments above are general in nature, and should not be relied upon without seeking further advice from your adviser.

Grant Ellis is an Associate Director with Prosperity Advisers Group.

Superannuation earnings tax announced – good investment performance punished

“Stockholm syndrome is the psychological phenomenon where hostages express empathy and sympathy and have positive feelings toward their captors.  These feelings are generally considered irrational in light of the danger or risk endured by the victims, who essentially mistake a lack of abuse from their captors for an act of kindness” (Wikipedia).

As I read through today’s superannuation announcements I experienced a moment of deep gratitude that the Federal Government had been generous enough not to proceed with the most medieval of the options that had been on the table.  I then began to calculate the material disadvantage that will affect families to which these rules apply.  I realised that in my momentary relief, I had forgotten that surely every family in our democracy is entitled to have certainty of outcome under the set of rules that were represented by the Government of the day to apply to their self-funded retirement.  The more I considered the rules, the more I realised how poorly these rules will operate in practice.  Many other ordinary people will innocently get caught in the clutches of these rules at some point.  Make no mistake, as the compulsory Superannuation Guarantee charge increases from 9% to 12% some ordinary individuals will become hostage to these rules.

Superannuation pension earnings tax

From 1 July 2014, future earnings (such as dividends and interest) on assets supporting income streams will be tax free up to $100,000 a year (indexed in $10,000 increments), the balance of earnings will be taxed at 15%.  Remarkably, these rules punish good investment performance.  For example, the Government announcement points out that “(a)assuming a conservative estimated rate of return of 5%, earnings of $100,000 would be derived from individuals with around $2 million in superannuation.  Ergo, if my fund earns 10%, I will be subject to tax once my assets are at the $1 million level.  While the announcement is silent on this point, heaven help me if after 1 July 2014 I buy a capital asset and sit on it for 10 years and then realise a $1 million gain to fund my pension as a one-off.  How does this get taxed?  Will we be averaging over 10 years to $100,000 per year (safe) or is $900,000 of that gain fair game in the year of sale for the higher tax rate.  What about the small business owners that the Government encourages to put their business property into superannuation.  Is that an extra 10% clip of the ticket now when you make a gain on the sale of your warehouse?  Small business already has it hard enough.  If I held that business asset for 15 years outside of superannuation I would pay no tax.  Surely it was not intended that the superannuation system would be an inferior option.

Has the Government forgotten the GFC when there were double digit annual declines in return which depressed superannuation balances and for which superannuation pensioners were not compensated by the tax system.  Now if there is a 20-30% surge forward in one year do people who should not be punished by this system suddenly find they are subject to the system just as they earn their losses back?  Surely not.

I see the need for averaging, as well as extension of small business relief, as items that will rapidly get on the drafting agenda.

Pension withdrawals themselves will not be taxed.

Special transitional rules for capital gains

  • Special arrangements will apply for capital gains on assets purchased before 1 July 2014:For assets that were purchased before 5 April 2013, the reform will only apply to capital gains that accrue after 1 July 2024;
  • For assets that are purchased from 5 April 2013 to 30 June 2014, individuals will have the choice of applying the reform to the entire capital gain, or only that part that accrues after 1 July 2014; and
  • For assets that are purchased from 1 July 2014, the reform will apply to the entire capital gain.

Common sense arrives for “excessive contributions”

Many innocent people have been subject to a punitive rate of tax if they accidentally exceed their concessional contributions threshold.  They get taxed at 46.5% even if their personal tax rate is lower.  Moreover, if the excessive contribution was accidental, it has not been possible to withdraw the excess contribution and correct the error.  Pleasingly from 1 July 2013, it will be possible to withdraw the excessive contributions, be taxed at your ordinary rate with an interest charge on the benefit of a tax timing difference that arises because of the different tax payment dates of the superannuation fund.

In closing, the Government’s announced superannuation reforms are “less bad” than expected. Are we grateful that they are less bad?  Yes.  Can they unfairly single out and materially change the expected retirement income projections for taxpayers who have retired and generated asset balances around $1 million?  Yes, but only if they invest well.  Do they potentially punish people who have balances well under $1 million if they have a good year?  Yes.  Is mediocre performance more likely to avoid the tax than good performance?  Yes.  Oh dear.

Save up to $1,200 by prepaying your private health insurance

As part of the 2012 Federal Budget, the Federal Government proposes to means test the government rebate on private health insurance payments paid on or after 1 July 2012.  For those adversely affected, prepaying your private health insurance before 1 July 2012 could save you real money!  The Federal Government also propose to means test the Medicare Levy Surcharge levied on individuals without private insurance hospital cover.  These measures and what you should do is discussed below.

Private Health Insurance Rebate

For payments of private health insurance from 1 July 2012, the rebate will depend on the age and “adjusted taxable incomes” (see below) of singles and families.

The changes will adversely impact:

  • Singles aged under 70 years of age with an adjusted taxable income of more than $84,000
  • Singles aged 70 and over with an adjusted taxable income of more than $97,000
  • Family members aged under 70 years of age with a family adjusted taxable income of more than $168,000
  • Family members aged 70 and over with a family adjusted taxable income of more than $194,000

For these purposes adjusted taxable income is calculated as your taxable income, adjusted to include fringe benefits, tax free pensions, tax exempt foreign income, reportable super contributions and total net investment losses, less any deductible child support expenditure.

The tables below show the revised rebate rates.

Singles (single on the last day of the year and have no dependants)

 

Adjusted Taxable Income

 Age

Up to $84,000

$84,001 – $97,000

$97,001 – $130,000

$130,001 or more

Under 65:

30%

20%

10%

0%

65-69 years:

35%

25%

15%

0%

70 and over:

40%

30%

20%

0%

 

Families  (if you have a spouse on the last day of the income year, or are a single parent with one or more dependants)

 

Adjusted Taxable Income

 Age

Up to $168,000

$168,001 – $194,000

$194,001 – $260,000

$260,001 or more

Under 65:

30%

20%

10%

0%

65-69 years:

35%

25%

15%

0%

70 and over:

40%

30%

20%

0%

Note: The family income thresholds are increased by $1,500 for every dependant child after the first child.

Medicare Levy Surcharge

The same adjusted taxable income criteria will also be used to determine an individual or family’s exposure to the Medicare Levy Surcharge from 1 July 2012.  The rate of the Medicare Levy Surcharge will be means tested and taxed up to a maximum of 1.5% as per the tables below.

The changes will adversely impact:

  • Singles with an adjusted taxable income of more than $97,000
  • Family members with a family adjusted taxable income of more than $194,000

Singles (single on the last day of the year and have no dependants)

 

Adjusted Taxable Income

 

Up to $84,000

$84,001 – $97,000

$97,001 – $130,000

$130,001 or more

All ages:

0%

1.0%

1.25%

1.5%

Families (if you have a spouse on the last day of the income year, or are a single parent with one or more dependants)

 

Adjusted Taxable Income

 

Up to $168,000

$168,001 – $194,000

$194,001 – $260,000

$260,001 or more

All ages:

0%

1.0%

1.25%

1.5%

Note: The family income thresholds are increased by $1,500 for every dependant child after the first child.

What can you do?  What should you do?

If you would be adversely affected by these measures, you should consider:

  • Prepaying your annual private health insurance before 1 July 2012 to maximise the private health insurance rebate available to you (on a $4,000 policy, the saving could be up to $1,200); and
  • Taking up private health insurance hospital cover to avoid the Medicare Levy Surcharge (if applicable).

If you are unsure whether you might be adversely impacted by these measures or would like to talk about the implications/opportunities, contact me or your Prosperity Adviser for advice.

Michael Griffiths is a Director of Business Services and Taxation at Prosperity Advisers.


Image source; Flickr; Ryan Smith Photography


Super tax to be doubled for high income earners

If the Government raises the super contribution tax to 30% for high income earners in the budget next week, will you be affected?The Government announced to the major media over the weekend that Wayne Swan is going to double the 15% tax on concessional superannuation contributions to 30% for those with adjusted income over $300,000 per annum in his budget speech on 8th May 2012.  

 

For these purposes, adjusted income is expected to include taxable income, concessional superannuation contributions, adjusted fringe benefits, total net investment loss, some foreign income, tax-free pensions and benefits, less child support.

As a result of the adjusted income definition, a taxpayer with salary income of say $250,000 but with significant negative gearing into property or shares might still be caught by these measures.

The start date for this change is expected to be 1 July 2012 (although it is conceivable that this could be brought forward to budget night – 8 May 2012 – if budget surplus pressures are strong enough).

The 30% tax rate will apply to all concessional superannuation contributions with one exception.  The exception is where the adjusted income threshold of $300,000 is breached by an amount less than your concessional superannuation contributions amount.  In that case, the 30% tax rate will only apply to the concessional superannuation contributions that exceeds the adjusted income threshold.

Whilst it is said this change will affect just 128,000 people nationwide, it is clearly something that, if it impacts you, you may want to consider preparing for now.

Under certain circumstances, those who may not ordinarily have an adjusted income of $300,000 or more may have to be alert to this change.  For example, this could impact investors selling assets such as property or shares which might throw their adjusted income above the threshold (in the year they enter contracts to sell).

The measure will increase the tax on a standard $25,000 contribution by $3,750 per person in a move that is estimated to bring in more than $1 billion in revenue over the period forecast in the budget.
What can you do?  What should you do? 

If you are unsure whether you might be impacted by these measures, contact your Prosperity Adviser for advice, or speak to one of our leading wealth advisers, John Manuel or Gavin Fernando, who work across our Newcastle, Sydney and Brisbane offices.

If you would be affected by these measures, you should consider:

  • Maximising your concessional superannuation contributions for the 2012 year whilst the tax rate is still 15% (if possible, it would be ideal if this could be done prior to the budget announcement on 8 May 2012 in case the expected start date is brought forward); and
  • Other ways to build wealth in superannuation, including property ownership in a self managed superannuation fund.